Nipah virus struck back Kerala within a short span

Nipah virus struck back Kerala within a short span: It was a nightmare for Kerala when the dreadful Nipah virus infection was first reported from Kozhikode on May 2018. There were 18 confirmed cases out of which 17 kicked the bucket due to infection. By July with articulated measures, the things have paced back to normalcy.

Just a year passed by, and it is reported again in the same state that the epidemic virus is back. A 23-year-old man from Kochi’s Ernakulam has been a confirmed victim to the infection. However, the health minister of Kerala state KK Shylaja alerted the people not to get distressed as all the welfare measures are in a place, unlike the previous year.

ust a year passed by, and it is reported again in the same state that the epidemic virus is back. A 23-year-old man from Kochi’s Ernakulam has been a confirmed victim to the infection.

However, the health minister of Kerala state KK Shylaja alerted the people not to get distressed as all the welfare measures are in a place, unlike the previous year.

Nipah Virus First Infection

Nipah virus first appeared in a Malaysian village called Sungai Nipah in 1998, and hence the virus has been christened the name. It killed more than 100 people when it first appeared.

When it debuted Kerala in our country, immediate measures have been taken, and hospitals were briefed about the infection and control measures, and the medical staff were given protective equipment. Samples of 337 patients were tested for the infection out of which only 18 tested positive.

Similar sample tests have been conducted in other states as well, but no test-positives turned out. Nevertheless, deaths were inevitable last time. Even a nurse has got infected while treating a patient and lost her life.

The primary Nipah agents are identified as fruit-eating bats. Even the first Nipah-hit case’s parents from Kerala endorsed that by saying “he likes mangoes and eat a lot. Possibilities are there that those fruits might have been bitten by bats.

There are a lot of bats surrounding the house.” The spread chain would be animal-human-human. More often the infection would be from either the bats or pigs. This virus does not spread through the air but through body fluids like cough, saliva etc. This time the infected person identified as a student from a private college Idukki who attended a camp in Thrissur.

People in nearby three districts should come under the scanner. The government has listed out thus far 86 people who have recently in contact with the victim. Since there were no labs to test the sample and must be aired to Pune every time, the time-management and responses have gone astray.

A lab was set-up in Kerala now, and the results are getting known in 3-4 hours. The most contemplating topic is why has the virus not shown up in other places but for Kerala?